Category: Mustang Q&A

Here's the place to get all of your Mustang related questions answered by experts in the industry. Find the answers to common questions and debunk popular misconceptions in this section of the AmericanMuscle blog. Can't find the question or answer you're looking for? Leave a comment or give us a call and we'd be happy to help!

Which Engine Oil is Best for My Mustang?

Fluid Factoids Part I: The Mystery of Motor Oil

Question: How do I know what type of engine oil is right for my car?

 

Answer:

Image from Lawnsite.com

If you Google this topic you’ll get thousands of different answers from thousands of different sources.  The debate over engine oil has been raging for decades and spans far beyond the age-old “synthetic vs. conventional” dispute.  Oil is the lifeblood of your engine and without it–well… you know what can happen.  So if you’ve ever found yourself standing in front of the “wall ’o’ oil” at the local parts place with a blank stare and a puddle of drool slowly accumulating under you, then hopefully this article will help make your next oil purchase a little less er… drooly. (more…)

What Do I Need to Lower My Mustang?

Question: I want to lower my Mustang; do I need anything other than lowering springs?

Answer:

Lowering springs are one of our biggest sellers, and if you want to slam your Stang to the pavement and tighten up your handling they’re undoubtedly the way to go, but installing just springs could lead to a slew of other problems down the road.  Check out our article on suspension basics and terminology, it will help you visualize what’s going on with your suspension from stock to slammed.

A Shocking Revelation…

$200-$300 for a 1”-2” drop seems like a steal, but in a few thousand miles your OE shocks and struts will be crying for help – aftermarket shocks/struts are a must.  Lowering springs are shorter than factory, so they compress the factory shock/strut beyond what it’s designed to handle. The additional pressure will eventually break through the seals, resulting in a “blown” shock/strut.  Lowering a car over stock shocks/struts causes the suspension to react uncharacteristically and can result in bottoming out and/or loss of control of the vehicle.  Tokico HP shocks/struts are a great match for any aftermarket spring and would be my recommendation for a daily driver or non-track car.  Adjustable shocks struts are great for street/track use, but keep in mind that they do not change the ride height – they allow the dampening to be fine-tuned for race applications.

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How Can I Install a Supercharger on a Budget?

Ford Mustang Q&A

Michael asked: “I purchased a Vortech V2 supercharger for my ‘98 Mustang GT. What can I do to install it on a budget? I bought it second hand, and like so many other people, I don’t have money burning holes in my pockets. I was told to invest in an intercooler, MSD ignition, headers, and to remap my computer. It is a weekend driver so it won’t see any track time, only the road. The engine is a mostly-stock 4.6-liter V-8, just a chip and Borla exhaust. Any other info or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks again!”


Answer: With the economy in the crapper, it seems we’re all on a budget these days. Many of our customers are taking the Do-It-Yourself route, which is saving them big bucks on install fees. However, Mustang supercharger kits are NOT a DIY project for anyone without years of hands-on experience with cars and performance mods.

Doing engine work like this “on a budget” is risky. It’s imperative that everything be installed correctly or you could wind up with a connecting rod poking through your engine block. No one wants to see that. If you don’t have the dough for the best parts and the best shop, then putting your money in the right places can make all the difference.

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Which Exhaust Set-up Provides the Most HP for an ’06 GT?

Ford Mustang Q&A

Karl A asked: “I just purchased a 2006 GT convertible. I really want to put a lot of time and money into my new car, not only to make it look good, but powerful too. The first thing I want to do is upgrade my exhaust. I’d like a strong old school muscle car rumble and growl but I don’t exactly know where to start. I have been told to get Flowmaster axel back mufflers with cross pipes. I have been told H pipes are good, and many other options. My goal would be for extra power, and of course, a loud, muscular sound. I would appreciate any advice here. I want to put work into my new car and do it right!”

An aftermarket exhaust is a great place to start when modding any car. A complete system can add an extra 40 hp at the rear wheels with a tune. Our tech article on understanding exhaust systems is a must-read for any first-time modder. Before I get into the nitty-gritty of exhaust systems, here are some important points everyone should know about aftermarket exhausts:

  1. Purchase your headers and mid-pipe from the same manufacturer – some manufacturers sell products that only bolt up to their own, or OEM, exhaust components.
  2. Long tube headers sometimes require oxygen sensor extensions, but always require a new mid-pipe (shorty mid-pipe).
  3. If you choose to run an exhaust with no catalytic converters you will need to re-tune the computer to get rid of the check engine light.

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How Do I Add Horsepower to My V6 Mustang?

Ford Mustang Q&A

V6Stang04 asked: “I have a stock V6 Ford Mustang, what can I do to increase it’s performance?”

As a V6 owner myself, I understand how frustrating it can be trying to modify a V6. While there is not as much aftermarket support for the V6s as there is for the V8s, there are still plenty of performance parts out there. Supercharger and turbo kits are available for V6s now. But if you’re starting slow or don’t have quite that much to spend I would recommend these three modifications first: a cold air intake, upgraded exhaust system and a tuner.

Top 3 V6 Mods That Add Horsepower

Ford Mustang Cold Air Intake1. Cold Air Intake

Cold air intake systems by themselves can add 8-10 horsepower to your car and are relatively inexpensive. A K&N FIPK V6 Intake kit would be a great option for any Mustang v6 owner due to its simple bolt-on installation and instant results. If you’re not looking to spend $200-$300 on a complete intake system, a K&N Drop-In Replacement Filter is a less-expensive alternative that will still net you a good amount of horsepower. Plus, a v6 aftermarket intake or filter can be cleaned and reused, so you’ll never have to buy another filter, saving you money in the long run.

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